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Log your accrued CPD hours

APS members get exclusive access to the logging tool to monitor and record accrued CPD hours.

2018 APS Congress

The 2018 APS Congress will be held in Sydney from Thursday 27 to Sunday 30 September 2018

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Recovering from disasters

Disasters and emergencies are powerful and upsetting incidents that intrude into daily life.

Many people have strong emotional or physical reactions following a disaster or emergency, and this is quite normal. For most, these reactions subside over a few days or weeks. These people are not experiencing mental health problems, but may be worried about practical issues, or require simple guidance on topics like talking with children about the disaster, or supporting friends and family members who have been affected by the disaster. Others may have quite significant distress which will respond to support, reassurance and problem solving.

For some, the symptoms may last longer and be more severe. This may be due to several factors such as the nature of the traumatic event, the level of available support, previous and current life stress, personality, and coping resources. These people might need additional support to help them cope. A small minority of people are at risk of developing significant mental health conditions and will require specialised mental health care.

Promoting safety, comfort and help after disasters

When a disaster happens in a community, it can be highly distressing for many people. But there is a lot that family, friends, volunteers and community members can do to help those affected.

Looking after children who have been affected by disasters

Find out information on how to look after children affected by disasters.

Guidelines for provision of psychological support following disasters

This information sheet provides summary guidelines on the three levels of psychological support that can be offered to people affected by disasters - for health professionals.

Psychological First Aid: A guide to supporting people affected by disaster

Red Cross psychological first aid guide for people working in disaster preparedness, response & recovery. It provides best practice in psychological first aid following disasters & traumatic events.

Psychological First Aid: A guide to supporting people affected by disaster (Japanese)

Japanese translation of the Red Cross psychological first aid guide for people in disaster preparedness, response & recovery. It provides best practice in psychological first aid following disasters & traumatic events