Professor Tim Carey (Co-Chair)

Professor Tim Carey (Co-Chair)

Professor Tim Carey is the Director of the Centre for Remote Health in Alice Springs. Tim has a PhD in clinical psychology from the University of Queensland and an MSc in Statistics from the University of St Andrews. After he completed his PhD he spent 5 years working in the NHS in Scotland as a Chartered Clinical Psychologist in adult primary care. Tim was previously a Director on the Board of the Australian Psychological Society and is a member of the Regional, Rural, and Remote Advisory Group and the Indigenous Psychology Advisory Group. He has over 100 publications including books, book chapters, and peer-reviewed publications in scientific journals and has presented his work at national and international conferences. After returning from Scotland he was an Associate Professor in clinical psychology and the Course Convenor of the postgraduate clinical psychology program at the University of Canberra. His first role at the Centre for Remote Health was as the Mental Health Academic before becoming the Director in 2014. At the Centre for Remote Health he conducts research in health service delivery, provides supervision and training on mental health issues, and has operated a clinical psychology service within the public mental health service as well as within the drug and alcohol service. He has developed a mobile app called MindSurf as well as a transdiagnostic cognitive therapy called the Method of Levels (MOL).

Professor Lyn Littlefield (Co-Chair)

Professor Lyn Littlefield (Co-Chair)

Lyn Littlefield is the Executive Director of the Australian Psychological Society. During Lyn’s tenure as Executive Director, the APS has become extensively involved in a number of Government mental health initiatives as a development partner and in an advisory role on mental health practice standards and service delivery. Lyn is also a Professor of Child, Adolescent and Family Psychology at La Trobe University. She was previously the Head of the School of Psychology at La Trobe University and responsible for the management of undergraduate and postgraduate psychology programs across three campuses. Lyn was instrumental in establishing the professional Doctorate in Clinical Child, Adolescent and Family Psychology, the first of its type in Australia. She was the inaugural director of the Victorian Parenting Centre, and in 2001 received a Medal of the Order of Australia for service to the welfare of children and families and the advancement of training in the field of child, adolescent and family psychology. Prior to her academic career, she worked as a clinical psychologist for over 15 years in mental health hospital and community settings, and devoted much of her time to improving mental health services in these contexts.

Lyn sits on a number of Boards and is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and the Australian Institute of Management.

Winthrop Professor David Badcock

Winthrop Professor David Badcock

Winthrop Professor David Badcock received his D.Phil in Experimental Psychology at Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar, and then held post-doctoral appointments at UC Berkeley and Durham University before returning to Australia to Melbourne University. In 1996 he was appointed Professor at the University of Western Australia and served a period as Head of School. Throughout he has maintained an active research programme with more than 130 journal publications and has been recognized with Fellowships of the Australian Psychological Society, the Association for Psychological Science and the Academy of Social Sciences of Australia and an Honorary Professor of Vision Science at the University of Nottingham. He has held an Australian Professorial Fellowship and is currently President of the Psychology Foundation of Australia and Deputy Chair of the Australian Academy of Science National Committee for Brain and Mind. The focus of his research is on the function of the human visual system and he primarily employs behavioural measurement of human visual performance in both normal and abnormal groups of observers to reveal the underlying analyses performed by the visual system and the changes in those analyses in conditions associated with altered perception.

Associate Professor Jacquelyn Cranney

Professor Lyn Littlefield (Co-Chair)

Associate Professor Jacquelyn Cranney of the School of Psychology at the University of New South Wales has been a member of national committees on psychology education, including accreditation, since 2007. Her contributions have been in tandem with the successful completion of Australian Learning and Teaching Council/Office for Learning and Teaching (ALTC/OLT) initiatives that have progressed undergraduate psychology policy and practice. Specifically, learning outcomes and standards, educator networks, scholarship of learning and teaching, psychological literacy, and global literacy. Jacky has been an active contributor to APS national conferences, and has organised an international conference and several state forums on psychology education. She was recently co-leader on an OLT project on student success, and has also contributed to an OLT project on increasing Indigenous student engagement in psychology education. Jacky is a fervent believer in George Miller’s (1969) exhortation to “give psychology away”, particularly through providing opportunities to undergraduate students to develop psychological literacy (the intentional application of psychological science to meet personal, professional and societal needs). 

Professor Simon Crowe

Professor Simon Crowe

Simon Crowe is currently Professor of Neuroscience and Clinical Neuropsychology in the School of Psychology and Public Health at La Trobe University, and has recently completed his five year term as the Chair of the Academic Board of La Trobe University. Professor Crowe is the current Chair of the College of Clinical Neuropsychologists of the APS, and Chair of the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council (APAC). He is a past President of the APS and was on the Board of the APS from 2006-2008. He was Chair of the Heads of Department and Schools of Psychology Australia (HODSPA) in 2005. He is an Honorary Fellow of the APS, and a Fellow of the National Academy of Neuropsychology (US) and the Australian Institute of Company Directors. He is a past Editor of the journal, Australian Psychologist (2001-2005). Professor Crowe has been extensively involved in the psychology curriculum for upper secondary education and was Chief Examiner for Year 12 psychology in Victoria from 2003-2004. Professor Crowe maintains strong research programs in the biological basis of memory formation as well as conducting studies into the neuropsychology of neuropsychiatric disorders and a variety of neuropsychological assessment issues. He has published three monographs, more than 100 refereed journal articles and numerous book chapters, conference presentations, notes and commentaries. He has supervised more than 40 doctoral degree candidates (PhD and DPsych) as well as numerous Masters and fourth year theses. He continues to conduct an extensive private practice. 

Ms Maria James

Ms Maria James

Maria James is the Curriculum Manager for Science for Years Foundation-12 with the Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority. Her responsibilities include curriculum overview of VCE Psychology. She holds a Masters degree in Education (Curriculum) and has published secondary school textbooks for Junior Science and Senior Chemistry courses. Maria has held a variety of positions in several independent schools including, Head of Science, Dean of Students and Head of Senior College. She is passionate about motivating and engaging students with science. A particular interest for Maria is encouraging students to apply their knowledge and skills in science and in other areas to take action in local and global contexts. 

Professor David Kavanagh

Professor David Kavanagh

David Kavanagh is a research professor at the Institute of Health & Biomedical Innovation and School of Psychology & Counselling, Queensland University of Technology, and has adjunct chairs at the Universities of Queensland and Plymouth and at Griffith University. He is a clinical psychologist who completed training at the University of Sydney and Stanford, and has led a community health service, an academic department and research across a university faculty. His current research is split between the evaluation and national use of e-Psychology tools and resources, and the testing of an imagery-based motivational intervention—an application of his theoretical and empirical work on cognitive processes underpinning desires. His leadership roles in the APS have included membership of the Council and of the Division of Psychological Research, Education and Training (DPRET), and convening the e-Psychology Interest Group. He is a Fellow of the APS and an Honorary Fellow of the Australian Association of Cognitive-Behaviour Therapy (AACBT). Awards for his research have included the APS Distinguished Contribution to Psychological Science and Ian Mathew Campbell Prize in Clinical Psychology, Distinguished Career Award from AACBT, and Senior Scientist Award from the Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs. 

Professor Mike Kyrios

Professor Mike Kyrios

Mike is Director of the Research School of Psychology at the Australian National University. Most recently, he worked for Swinburne University, where he was Director of the Brain and Psychological Sciences Research Centre and led the National e-Therapy Centre. His areas of expertise include anxiety, depression, obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders, chronic health, cognitive-behavioural and self-based therapies. Mike has been a member of the APS since 1984 and has contributed to the APS in a broad range of leadership roles, including as a Director (2011–2013) and President-Elect (2014) on the APS Board and as National Chair of the College of Clinical Psychologists (2004–2006). He has also served on the Constituent Units Review Committee, the National Psychology Education and Training Reference Group, the Ethical Guidelines Committee, Health Workforce Committee, National Psychology Week Working Group, Conference Committees, DSM-5 Working Group and Australian Psychologist Editorial Group. 

Dr Jason Lodge

Dr Jason Lodge

Jason Lodge, PhD, is a psychological scientist and Senior Lecturer in the Melbourne Centre for the Study of Higher Education and the Australian Research Council funded Science of Learning Research Centre, University of Melbourne. Jason’s research concentrates on the application of the learning sciences to higher education. Specifically, he is interested in the cognitive and emotional factors that influence learning and behaviour and how research findings from the learning sciences can be better used to enhance design for learning, teaching practice and education policy. Jason is the coordinator of the APS Psychology Education Interest Group and 2014 recipient of the APS Early Career Teaching Award. 

Professor Tony Machin

Professor Tony Machin

Professor Tony Machin became a member of the APS in 1989 and joined the Department of Psychology at the University of Southern Queensland (USQ) in 1992. He is currently a Professor of Psychology and the Head of the School of Psychology and Counselling at USQ and is also on the Executive of the Heads of Departments and Schools of Psychology (HODSPA Inc.). Professor Machin has consulted with a wide range of clients including Queensland Health, the Department of Public Works, Main Roads, Queensland Transport, the Department of Industrial Relations, Queensland Treasury, the Department of Emergency Services, and the Royal National Agricultural and Industrial Association of Queensland. Professor Machin has been an Officer bearer for the APS College of Organisational Psychologists as well as Chair of the Toowoomba Branch of the APS and has represented the APS on accreditation visits to several Universities. He is also the Australasian representative on Division 13 - Traffic and Transportation Psychology of the International Association for Applied Psychology. He has also been a reviewer for 31 refereed journals and an external examiner for 12 Universities. He has published 34 refereed journal articles, 19 book chapters and refereed conference papers, has 63 conference presentations and 101 industry reports. 

Professor Paul Martin

Professor Paul Martin

Paul R. Martin is a Professor in the School of Applied Psychology at Griffith University. He is a clinical and health psychologist who completed his training at the Universities of Bristol and Oxford. He is a Fellow of the British Psychological Society, an Honorary Fellow of the Australian Psychological Society (APS), and a Fellow of the International Association of Applied Psychology. He has held a number of professional leadership positions including National President of the Australian Behaviour Modification Association, and Director of Science and then President of the APS. He was President of the 27th International Congress of Applied Psychology held in Melbourne in 2010. His main research interest has been headache and migraine, with subsidiary interests in stress, depression (including postnatal depression), and social support. He has authored/edited eight books and 147 journal articles and chapters. His research program has received extensive funding including 12 Project Grants from National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) (he is the primary investigator on eight of these grants). In 2003 he received a Centenary Medal “For service to Australian society and medicine”, and in 2015 he received a Medal of the Order of Australia “For service to medicine in the field of psychology”. 

Professor Shirley Morrissey

Professor Shirley Morrissey

Shirley Morrissey is Professor of Psychology and Director of Clinical Psychology at Griffith University, and a practising clinical and health psychologist. Her research strengths are in the areas of health and clinical psychology. Shirley has supervised 12 PhD students, 4 DPsychs, 12 Masters and more than 30 Honours students to completion. She also has particular expertise in ethics and professional practice and in interprofessional learning (IPL). She is a chapter author and one of the editors of the 2nd Edition of the text Ethics and Professional Practice for Psychologists. She was awarded an Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC) Leadership Grant for her work on preparing students for multi-disciplinary mental health practice. Shirley is the IPL lead for the School of Applied Psychology at Griffith University and has been instrumental in ensuring psychology students have the opportunity to participate in IPL activities. Shirley serves on the Australian Psychological Society’s Division of Psychological Research and Teaching committee, the APS Ethics Committee, the APS Program Development and Approval Committee, and is an Associate Editor for the Australian Psychologist. Shirley was appointed as a Director of APAC in July 2014, she serves on the APAC Assessor Committee and was awarded the APS Distinguished Award for Contribution to Psychological Education in 2015.

This page was last updated 5 Oct 2016